What we cook.. !!

Timing : 12-3.30 (Lunch) , 3.30 - 7.00 (Snacks) , 7- 10.30 pm (Dinner)

We are providing North indian & Rajasthani Foods

The Marwari cuisine is strictly vegetarian and offers a fabulous variety of mouthwatering dishes. This section is incomplete without the mention of the famed Dal-Baati-Churma. One thing common for baatis, irrespective of their cooking technique is that they are always served dipped in ghee accompanied with panchmel or panch kutti dal and churma. The dal is cooked with ghee, the masalas in the dal are fried in ghee and more ghee is mixed into the dal before serving.

Rajasthani cooking was inclined to the war-like lifestyle of the medieval Rajasthan and the availability of ingredients of the region. Food that could last for several days and could be eaten without heating was preferred, more out of necessity than choice. Scarcity of water, fresh green vegetables have had their effect on cooking. In the desert belt of Jaisalmer, Barmer and Bikaner, cooks use a minimum of water and prefer, instead, to use more milk, buttermilk and clarified butter. A distinct feature of the Maheshwari cooking is the use of mango powder, a suitable substitute for tomatoes, scarce in the desert, and Asafetida, to enhance the taste in the absence of garlic and onions. Generally, Rajasthani curries are a brilliant red but they are not as spicy as they look. Most Rajasthani cuisine uses pure ghee as the medium of cooking. A favourite sweet dish called lapsi is prepared with broken wheat sautéed in ghee and sweetened. Perhaps the best-known Rajasthani food is the combination of dal, bati and churma(dal is lentils;bati is baked wheat ball; and churma is powdered sweetened cereal), but for the adventurous traveller, willing to experiment, there is a lot of variety available. Besides, each region is distinguished by its popular sweet - Mawa Kachori from Jodhpur, Alwar ka Mawa, Malpuas from Pushkar, Rasogullas from Bikaner, Ghevar from Jaipur to name a few.